In this report the authors discuss potential approaches for reducing emissions of particulate matter (PM) from road vehicle non-exhaust sources, such as tyre wear, brake wear, road surface wear and the resuspension of road dust. The measures include improved materials, in situ particle collection and destruction, improved vehicle design, road and vehicle cleaning, and the use of dust suppressants and de-icing liquids. However, with the exception of road sweeping/washing and the use of de-icing compounds, hardly any of the published literature refers specifically to effectiveness at reducing non-exhaust PM emissions. The various measures are therefore tentatively rated according to several factors, including the likely impact on PM emissions, cost and technical feasibility.
Reducing average vehicle weight and road silt loading (e.g. by vehicle washing, road sweeping, etc.) ought to lead to a reduction in resuspension. However, the evidence indicates that road sweeping or washing is not a particularly effective means of reducing PM10 concentrations. The use of certain de-icing liquids appears to be associated with a reduction in ambient PM10 levels. The application of dust suppressants may also be effective, but there are various concerns about the potential health and environmental impacts of the compounds used. Little is known about the effectiveness of vehicle-based abatement options, and as there are currently no legislative requirements for vehicle manufacturers to control non-exhaust PM it is doubtful that the relevant technologies will be introduced in the near future. The report concludes that further experimental work is required to evaluate the effectiveness of different methods at reducing emissions and improving air quality.

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