The use of passively safe lighting columns and signposts is becoming increasingly common on both Highways Agency and local authority rural roads. They are particularly suitable where it would be difficult to use a safety barrier, or where the safety barrier itself could pose a hazard, for example at a nosing or on a roundabout splitter island. They have, to date, mainly been constructed of aluminium although more recently, steel and fibre reinforced composite posts have also become available.
TRL has been commissioned by Transport for London (TfL) to investigate the use of passively safe lighting columns and signposts on local roads, the research being initiated by the CSS Street Lighting Group. This report seeks to develop an understanding of any changes in safety risk that might result from introducing passively safe lighting columns and signposts in such areas.
The report recommends that passively safe lighting columns continue to be used in accordance with the National Annex to BS EN 12767.
Furthermore passively safe lighting columns should be used on major urban roads where there is little likelihood of their falling onto the carriageway or where there might be pedestrians. Since most of the run-off collisions occur at night, the latter will not be an issue in many locations. Where speeds are low, for example, in 20 mph zones, or on housing estates, there is little if any advantage in using passively signposts and lighting columns.
Other titles in this series:
SL1 ‘Review of the class and quality of street lighting’. G I Crabb, R Beaumont and D Webster. TRL Published Report PPR380. 2008
SL2 ‘Invest to save – sustainable street lighting’. P Fox. Mouchell. 2008
SL3 ‘Review of luminaire maintenance factors’. A Sanders. Mott MacDonald. 2008
SL5 ‘Review of the lighting requirements for traffic signs and bollards’. J Cooper, K Stafford, P Owlett and J Mitchell. TRL Published Project Report PPR382. 2008
SL6 Guidance on the lighting requirements for traffic signs and bollard. J Cooper and J Mitchell. TRL Published Project Report PPR383. 2008

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